Ambitious climate action commitments by states, local governments and communities – Sep 2020

Science tells us that we need to reach net-zero emissions by midcentury to limit global warming to 1.5°C and to reduce the destructive impacts of climate change on human society and nature. In Australia, more and more local governments and communities are demonstrating climate leadership by committing to ambitious carbon or renewable energy goals. This trend is also reflected at state and territory level. As of 9 July 2020, every single Australian state and territory has a formal target to reach net zero by 2050.

100% Renewables has been tracking ambitious carbon and renewable energy commitments made by all levels of Australian governments since we developed the 100% Renewable Energy Master Plan for Lismore City Council in 2014. In May 2017, we published our first blog post on the energy and carbon commitments of states, territories and local governments. We posted several updates since then – in March 2018, October 2018 and in October 2019.

Please see below a video, which shows the timeline of ambitious climate commitments of local governments from 2017 to 2020.

In this update, we present a graphic with state and territories commitments. We also show state-by-state commitments by capital cities, local governments and communities. We also cover memberships by local governments of the Cities Power Partnership, CEDAMIA, the Global Compact of Mayors, and C40.

States’ and territories’ climate change commitments

States and territories are committing to both renewable energy as well as carbon reduction targets. Most targets are in line with the Paris Agreement, which means that zero net emissions have to be reached by mid-century to avoid catastrophic climate change.

 Further information

If you are interested in learning more about what it means to set targets in line with the Paris Agreement, please read our blog post on ‘Science-based targets in a nutshell’.

STATE OR TERRITORYRENEWABLE ENERGY COMMITMENTCARBON COMMITMENT
Australia~20% from renewable energy sources by 2020 (33,000 GWh by 2020)
(Target achieved)
26-28% emissions reduction from 2005 levels by 2030
NSW20% from renewable energy in line with the RET35% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions on 2005 levels by 2030
Zero net emissions by 2050
NT50% renewable energy by 2030Zero net emissions by 2050
SA50% renewable energy production by 2025
(Target achieved in 2018)
Zero net emissions by 2050
TAS100% renewable energy by 2022
200% renewable energy by 2040 (expected to be legislated in 2020)
Commitment to establish a zero net emissions target by 2050
QLD50% renewable energy by 2030Zero net emissions by 2050
VIC25% renewable energy by 2020
40% renewable energy by 2025
50% renewable energy by 2030
Zero net emissions by 2050
WANo targetZero net emissions by 2050

 Further information

For more information on the net zero plan of NSW, please have a read of our blog post ‘NSW Net Zero Plan Stage 1: 2020–2030’.

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by states and territories as at Sept 2020
Figure 1: Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by states and territories as at Sept 2020

Capital cities’ climate change commitments

Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane have been carbon neutral for many years and soon, they will be joined by Adelaide. The ACT Government has strong carbon reduction targets in place, while Perth has only committed to a carbon reduction target of 20%. Hobart doesn’t have any official targets but has a strong history of carbon reduction initiatives.

 Further information

If you are interested in learning more about the differences of ‘carbon-neutral’ and ‘net-zero’, you can read our blog post on ’What is the meaning of carbon-neutral, net-zero and climate-neutral?‘.

For more information on how to become carbon neutral under Climate Active, please have a read of our blog post series on ‘Climate Active – Frequently Asked Questions’.

Exciting developments are that from January 2019, Melbourne and the City of Newcastle have been powered by 100% renewable energy, which was soon followed by the City of Sydney and Hawkesbury Council.

 Further information

If you are interested in how you can achieve 100% renewable energy, you can read our blog post on ‘Eight ways to achieve 100% renewable electricity’.

You can also download our whitepaper on ‘How to achieve 100% renewable energy’

CAPITAL CITYCOMMITMENT
ACT Government100% renewable electricity by 2020
40% reduction in GHG emissions from 1990 by 2020
50-60% reduction in GHG emissions from 1990 by 2025
65-75% reduction in GHG emissions from 1990 by 2030
90-95% reduction in GHG emissions from 1990 by 2040
Net zero emissions by 2045
Adelaide100% renewable from July 2020
Zero net emissions from council operations by 2020
Zero net carbon emissions by 2025 for the community
BrisbaneCarbon neutral council from 2017
Melbourne100% renewable energy from 2019
Carbon neutral from 2012
Net zero emissions for the LGA by 2040
Sydney100% renewable energy for council operations by 2021
Carbon neutral from 2008
Reduce emissions by 70% for the LGA by 2030
Net zero emissions for the LGA by 2040

Local governments – ambitious commitments

The following table showcases ambitious carbon and energy commitments by capital cities and local governments and their communities. ‘Ambitious’ means that commitments need to be in line with science. If a local government is committing to the same goal as the state or territory jurisdiction it falls under, it is not considered ambitious, as it is implied that the local government will decarbonise consistent with state or territory policies. Please note that in future updates to this list, we will only report on net-zero targets ahead of 2050.

The following tables are split into renewable energy commitments and carbon reduction commitments.

 Further information

If you are interested in learning more about the difference between renewable energy and carbon targets, you can read our blog post on whether carbon neutral and 100% renewables are the same.

If you are interested in learning more about target scopes, you should read our target series, starting at the blog post ‘What should be the scope of your target’.

STATE OR TERRITORYLOCAL GOVERNMENTSRENEWABLE ENERGY COMMITMENTCARBON COMMITMENT
ACTACT100% renewable electricity by 202065-75% reduction in GHG emissions from 1990 by 2030
Net zero emissions by 2045
NSWBathurst Regional50% of council’s electricity consumption to be from renewable sources by 2025
NSWBega Valley Shire CouncilNet zero emissions, with interim target
of 100% renewable electricity by 2030
NSWBellingen Shire Council100% renewable energy by 203045% carbon reduction by 2030 (based on 2010 emissions levels)
Zero net emissions by 2040
NSWBlacktown City CouncilNet-zero GHG emissions from electricity, fuel and gas by 2030
NSWBroken Hill Council100% renewable energy status by 2030
NSWBlue Mountains City CouncilCarbon neutral by 2025
NSWByron Bay Council100% renewable energy by 2027Net zero by 2025
NSWCentral Coast Council60% emissions reduction of Council emissions (below 2017/18 levels) by 2022 and 85% by 2028
NSWCity of Canada BayNet zero emissions by 2030
NSWCity of Newcastle100% renewable electricity from 2020
NSWCity of Ryde100% renewable energy by 2030
NSWCoffs Harbour City Council100% renewable energy by 203050% reduction in emissions (on 2010 levels) by 2025
NSWDubbo Regional Council 50% renewable energy by 2025
NSWEurobodalla Shire Council100% renewable energy by 2030
NSWFederation CouncilElectricity neutral (i.e. generating electricity
equal to, or greater than its consumption) by
June 2025
NSWHornsby Shire Council32% emissions reduction from 2018 by 2025
53% emissions reduction from 2018 by 2030
NSWInner West Council100% renewable electricity by 2025Carbon neutral by 2025
100% divestment from fossil fuel
NSWGeorges River Council100% renewable target by 2025Net zero carbon emissions by 2025 or as soon as practicable
NSWKu-ring-gai CouncilAchieve 100% renewable energy by 2030, whilst pursuing efforts to reach this target by 2025Net zero emissions by 2040, or earlier, and a 50% reduction, by 2030
100% reduction in fleet emissions by 2040
NSWKyogle Council25% electricity from on-site solar by 2025
50% renewable electricity by 2025
100% renewable electricity by 2030
NSWLismore City CouncilSelf-generate all electricity needs from renewable sources by 2023
NSWNambucca CouncilZero net carbon emissions within the 2030 to 2050 time frame
NSWNorthern Beaches CouncilAll suitable sites being powered by renewable electricity by 2030Net zero emissions by 2045
60% reduction in carbon emissions by 2040
Aspiration to achieve net zero emissions by 2030
NSWParramatta CouncilCarbon neutral by 2022
NSWPort Macquarie-Hastings Council100% renewable energy by 2027
NSWRandwick Council100% renewable by 2030 for stationary and transport energyZero emissions by 2030
NSWSutherland Shire CouncilCarbon neutral by 2030
NSWSydney100% renewable energy for council operations by 2021Carbon neutral from 2008
NSWTweed Shire Council25% less electricity related carbon emissions (as tonnes CO2-e) than 2016/17 by 2022
50% less electricity related carbon emissions (as tonnes CO2-e) than 2016/17 by 2025
Net zero emissions by 2030
NSWWaverley Council70% reduction of Council emissions (2003/04 levels) by 2030
Carbon neutral by 2050
NSWWilloughby City CouncilBy 2028 emit 50% less GHG emissions from operations compared with 2008/09
Achieve net zero emissions by 2050
NSWWollongong CouncilAspirational emissions reduction target of zero emissions by 2030
QLDBrisbane City CouncilCarbon neutral since 2017
QLDCairns Regional CouncilReduce emissions by 50% below 2007/08 levels by 2020
QLDGold Coast City CouncilCarbon neutral by 2020
QLDIpswich City CouncilCarbon neutral by 2021
QLDLogan CouncilCarbon neutral by 2022
QLDNoosa CouncilNet zero emissions by 2026
QLDSunshine Coast CouncilNet zero emissions by 2041
SAAdelaide100% renewable from July 2020Zero net emissions from council operations by 2020
TASCity of Launceston Council100% renewables by 2025100% neutrality of carbon emissions by 2025
VICBanyule City CouncilCarbon neutral operations by 2028
VICBass Coast Shire CouncilZero net emissions by 2030
VICBayside City CouncilCarbon neutral by 2020
VICBrimbank City Council50% reduction in corporate greenhouse emissions by 2023
VICCasey City CouncilCarbon neutral by 2040
VICCity of Ballarat Council100% renewables by 2025Zero emissions by 2025
VICCity of Greater Bendigo100% renewable energy by 2036
VICCity of Greater Geelong100% renewable electricity supply for all City owned and operated buildings and streetlights by 2025City-managed operations to be carbon neutral by 2025
City-owned light fleet vehicles to be powered by zero-emission sources by 2030
VICCity of Port PhillipZero net emissions by 2020
VICCity of Yarra100% renewable electricity since 2019Carbon neutral since 2012
VICDarebin City CouncilCarbon neutral by 2020 for both operations and the community
VICFrankston City CouncilZero net emissions by 2025
VICHepburn CouncilCarbon neutral by 2021
VICHobsons BayReach zero net GHG emissions from council’s activities by 2020
VICGlen EiraNet zero emissions from operations by 2025
VICGolden Plains Shire CouncilNet zero emissions by 2040
50% reduction in Council emissions by 2023
VICMacedon Ranges Shire CouncilZero net emissions by 2030-2031
VICManningham100% carbon neutral by 2020
VICMoonee Valley City CouncilZero net emissions by 2020
VICMaribyrnong City CouncilNet zero corporate CO2 emissions from 2015
VICMelbourne100% renewable energy from 2019Carbon neutral since 2012 for council operations
VICMoreland Council100% renewable energy by 2019Carbon neutral for operations since 2012
VICMornington Peninsula CouncilCarbon neutral by 2021
VICMount Alexander Shire CouncilCarbon neutral by 2025
VICStrathbogie Shire CouncilZero net emissions by 2025
VICWarrnambool City CouncilZero net emissions by 2040
VICWellington Shire CouncilNet zero emissions by 2040
VICWyndhamCarbon neutral for corporate GHG emissions by 2040
WACity of BayswaterCorporate renewable energy target of 100% by 2030Corporate GHG emissions reduction target of 100% by 2040
WACity of Fremantle100% renewable energy by 2025Carbon neutral since 2009
WAMandurahCarbon neutral by 2020

From the list above, 100% Renewables is proud to have developed many of the strategies and plans for councils that have committed to ambitious targets, and/or helped them to deliver on their target, including:

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by NSW councils and the ACT Government

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by local governments in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory as at Sep 2020
Figure 2: Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by local governments in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory as at Sep 2020

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by VIC councils

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by local governments in VIC as at Sep 2020
Figure 3: Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by local governments in VIC as at Sep 2020

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by QLD councils

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by local governments in Queensland as at Sep 2020
Figure 4: Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by local governments in Queensland as at Sep 2020

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by SA councils

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by local governments in South Australia as at Sep 2020
Figure 5: Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by local governments in South Australia as at Sep 2020

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by WA councils

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by local governments in Western Australia as at Sep 2020
Figure 6: Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by local governments in Western Australia as at Sep 2020

Community climate change commitments

Until recently, most local governments focused on their own operations by developing targets and actions plans. With the increasing need to rapidly reduce carbon emissions to combat climate change, more and more councils are now looking at how they can lead and facilitate carbon mitigation in their communities.

The following table shows renewable energy and carbon commitments made by local governments on behalf of their community.

 Further information

For more information on how to set targets and develop action plans for communities, please have a read of our blog post on setting targets for community emissions.

STATE OR TERRITORYCOMMUNITYRENEWABLE ENERGY COMMITMENTCARBON COMMITMENT
NSWByron Bay CommunityNet zero by 2025
NSWCity of Canada BayNet zero emissions by 2050
NSWCity of WollongongNet zero emissions by 2050
NSWHawkesbury City CouncilCarbon neutral LGA by 2036
NSWInner West Council100% of schools have installed solar by 2036
Solar PV capacity is 20 times greater than in 2017 by 2036
Community emissions are 75% less than in 2017 in 2036
NSWKu-ring-gai CouncilNet zero GHG emissions by 2040
NSWLockhartPlan for town to be powered by renewable energy and operating on a microgrid
NSWMullumbimby100% renewable energy by 2020
NSWSydneyReduce emissions by 70% for the LGA by 2030
Net zero emissions for the LGA by 2040
NSWTweed Shire CouncilNet zero emissions by 2030
NSWTyalgum VillagePlan to be off the grid
100% renewable energy, with batteries
NSWUralla TownPlan to be first zero net energy town
NSWWaverley Council70% reduction of community emissions (2003/04 levels) by 2030
Carbon neutral by 2050
NSWWilloughby City CouncilBy 2028, our community will emit 30% less GHG emissions compared with 2010/11
SACity of AdelaideZero net carbon emissions by 2025
VICBass Coast Shire CouncilZero net emissions by 2030
VICCardinia Shire Council36% reduction in per capita community emissions by 2024
VICCity of DarebinZero net carbon emissions across Darebin by 2020
VICHealesvilleNet zero town by 2027
VICHobsons BayReach zero net GHG emissions from the community’s activities by 2030
VICGlen EiraNet zero emissions from the community by 2030
VICMelbourneNet zero emissions by 2040
VICMoonee Valley City CouncilZero net emissions by 2040
VICMoreland CouncilZero carbon emissions Moreland by 2040
VICNatimuk100% renewable energy with community solar farm
VICNewstead VillagePlan to be 100% renewable
VICWarrnambool CouncilCarbon neutral city by 2040
VICWyndhamZero net GHG emissions from electricity use in the municipality by 2040
VICYackandandah Town100% renewable energy by 2022
WACity of FremantleZero carbon for LGA by 2025
WAPerth32% reduction in citywide emissions by 2031

At this stage, only the NSW and VIC graphics have been split into council operations’ and communities’ commitments. For other states, please refer to the maps in the previous section.

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by NSW communities

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by communities in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory as at Sep 2020
Figure 7: Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by communities in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory as at Sep 2020

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by VIC communities

Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by communities in Victoria as at Sep 2020
Figure 8: Ambitious renewable energy and carbon commitments by communities in Victoria as at Sep 2020

From the list above, 100% Renewables is proud to have developed many of the renewable energy strategies and plans for communities including:

Local governments in Australia that have declared a climate emergency

Local governments are playing a key role in leading the climate emergency response, which is why CEDAMIA (derived from Climate Emergency Declaration and Mobilisation In Action) campaigns for a Climate Emergency Declaration at all levels of government.

CEDAMIA calls on all Australian federal, state, and territory parliaments and all local councils to:

  • Declare a climate emergency
  • Commit to providing maximum protection for all people, economies, species, ecosystems, and Civilisations, and to fully restoring a safe climate
  • Mobilise the required resources and take effective action at the necessary scale and speed
  • Transform the economy to zero emissions and make a fair contribution to drawing down the excess carbon dioxide in the air, and
  • Encourage all other governments around the world to take these same actions.

CEDAMIA works in conjunction in conjunction with CACE – Council Action in the Climate Emergency. Step 1 is to declare a climate emergency, and step 2 is to mobilise your community and move into emergency mode. According to CACE, a local government’s key role is to

  • Lobby state and national governments to adopt and fund full climate emergency response
  • Encourage other councils to implement a climate emergency response through networks and by leading by example
  • Have local emergency action through education, mitigation and resilience building
  • Educating council staff about the climate emergency and what council can do to respond

The following local governments have declared a climate emergency:

STATELOCAL GOVERNMENT
ACTAustralian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly
NSWArmidale Regional Council
NSWBallina Shire Council
NSWBega Valley Shire Council
NSWBellingen Shire Council
NSWBlacktown City Council
NSWBlue Mountains City Council
NSWBroken Hill City Council
NSWByron Shire Council
NSWCanada Bay City Council
NSWCanterbury Bankstown City Council
NSWCentral Coast Council
NSWClarence Valley Council
NSWGlen Innes Severn Shire Council
NSWHawkesbury City Council
NSWHunters Hill Council
NSWInner West Council
NSWKiama Municipal Council
NSWLane Cove Council
NSWLismore City Council
NSWMidCoast Council
NSWMosman Council
NSWNewcastle City Council
NSWNorth Sydney Council
NSWNorthern Beaches Council
NSWRandwick City Council
NSWRyde City Council
NSWSydney City Council
NSWTweed Shire Council
NSWUpper Hunter Shire Council
NSWWaverley Council
NSWWilloughby City Council
NSWWingecarribee Shire Council
NSWWollongong City Council
NSWWoollahra Municipal Council
NTDarwin City Council
QLDNoosa Shire Council
SAAdelaide City Council
SAAdelaide Hills Council
SAAlexandrina Council
SABurnside City Council
SACampbelltown City Council
SACharles Sturt City Council
SAGawler Town Council
SAHoldfast Bay City Council
SALight Regional Council
SAMitcham Council
SAMount Barker District Council
SAMurray Bridge Council
SAPort Adelaide Enfield City Council
SAPort Lincoln City Council
SASalisbury City Council
SAVictor Harbor Council
TASHobart City Council
TASKingborough Council
TASLaunceston City Council
VICBallarat City Council
VICBanyule City Council
VICBass Coast Shire Council
VICBayside City Council
VICBrimbank City Council
VICCardinia Shire Council
VICDarebin City Council
VICFrankston City Council
VICGlen Eira City Council
VICGreater Dandenong City Council
VICGreater Geelong City Council
VICGreater Shepparton City Council
VICHepburn Shire Council
VICHobsons Bay City Council
VICIndigo Shire Council
VICKingston City Council
VICManningham Council
VICMaribyrnong City Council
VICMelbourne City Council
VICMildura Rural City Council
VICMoonee Valley City Council
VICMount Alexander Shire Council
VICMoreland City Council
VICMornington Peninsula Shire Council
VICMoyne Shire Council
VICPort Phillip City Council
VICQueenscliffe Borough Council
VICStonnington City Council
VICSurf Coast Shire Council
VICWarrnambool City Council
VICYarra City Council
VICYarra Ranges Council
WAAugusta-Margaret River Shire Council
WADenmark Shire Council
WAEast Fremantle Town Council
WAFremantle City Council
WAMundaring Shire Council
WASwan City Council
WAVictoria Park Town Council
WAVincent City Council

 Further information

For more information on 5 key considerations for declaring for climate emergency plans, please read our article, which also includes a video.

Local Governments that are members of Cities Power Partnership

The Cities Power Partnership (CPP) is Australia’s largest local government climate network, made up over 127 councils from across the country, representing almost 11 million Australians. Local councils who join the partnership make five action pledges in either renewable energy, efficiency, transport or working in partnership to tackle climate change.

There are dozens of actions that councils can choose from ranging from putting solar on council assets, switching to electric vehicles, to opening up old landfills for new solar farms. The following table shows current local government members of CPP.

STATELOCAL GOVERNMENT
ACTCanberra
NSWAlbury City Council
NSWBathurst Regional Council
NSWBayside Council
NSWBega Valley Shire
NSWBellingen Shire Council
NSWBlacktown City Council
NSWBlue Mountains City Council
NSWBroken Hill City Council
NSWByron Shire Council
NSWCity of Canterbury-Bankstown
NSWCentral Coast Council
NSWClarence Valley Council
NSWCoffs Harbour
NSWCumberland Council
NSWDubbo Regional Council
NSWEurobodalla Council
NSWGeorges River Council
NSWHawkesbury City Council
NSWHornsby Shire Council
NSWInner West Council
NSWKiama Council
NSWKu-ring-gai Council
NSWLane Cove Council
NSWLake Macquarie
NSWLismore City Council
NSWMosman Council
NSWMidCoast Council
NSWMuswellbrook Shire Council
NSWNambucca Shire Council
NSWThe City of Newcastle 
NSWhttps://citiespowerpartnership.org.au
NSWNorth Sydney Council
NSWOrange City Council
NSWParkes Shire Council
NSWCity of Parramatta
NSWPenrith City Council
NSWPort Macquarie-Hastings
NSWRandwick City Council
NSWCity of Ryde
NSWShellharbour City Council
NSWShoalhaven City Council
NSWCity of Sydney
NSWTweed Shire
NSWUpper Hunter Shire Council
NSWCity of Wagga Wagga
NSWWaverley Council
NSWWilloughby Council
NSWWingecarribee Shire
NSWWollongong City Council
NSWWoollahra Municipal Council
NTAlice Springs Town Council
NTCity of Darwin
QLDBrisbane City Council 
QLDBundaberg Regional Council
QLDCairns Regional Council
QLDDouglas Shire Council
QLDIpswich City Council 
QLDLivingstone Shire Council 
QLDLogan City Council
QLDMackay Regional Council
QLDNoosa Shire Council
QLDSunshine Coast Council
SAAdelaide Hills Council 
SACity of Adelaide
SAAlexandrina Council
SACity of Charles Sturt
SAGoyder Regional Council
SAMount Barker District Council 
SACity of Onkaparinga
SACity of Port Adelaide Enfield
SACity of Victor Harbor
TASBrighton Council
TASCity of Launceston
TASHuon Valley Council
TASGlamorgan Spring Bay
TASNorthern Midlands Council
VICCity of Ballarat
VICBaw Baw Shire Council
VICBenalla Rural City Council 
VICCity of Boroondara
VICCity of Darebin
VICCity of Greater Dandenong
VICHepburn Shire Council
VICCity of Melbourne
VICMildura Rural City Council
VICCity of Monash
VICMoonee Valley City Council
VICMoreland City Council
VICMornington Peninsula Shire
VICMount Alexander Shire Council
VICCity of Mitcham
VICNillumbik Shire Council
VICCity of Port Phillip
VICBorough of Queenscliffe
VICStrathbogie Shire Council
VICStonnington City Council
VICRural City of Wangaratta
VICWarrnambool City Council
VICWollongong City Council
VICWyndham City Council
VICCity of Yarra
VICYarra Ranges Council 
WACity of Armadale
WAShire of Augusta-Margaret River
WATown of Bassendean
WACity of Bayswater
WACity of Belmont
WACity of Bunbury
WACity of Busselton
WACity of Canning
WACity of Cockburn
WAShire of Donnybrook-Balingup
WACity of Fremantle
WACity of Gosnells
WACity of Kalgoorlie-Boulder
WACity of Kwinana
WACity of Melville
WAShire of Mundaring
WAShire of Murray
WAShire of Northam 
WACity of Rockingham
WAShire of Serpentine Jarrahdale
WACity of Subiaco
WACity of Swan
WATown of Victoria Park
WACity of Vincent

Local Governments that are members of Global Covenant of Mayors

Global Covenant of Mayors or GCoM is the largest global alliance for city climate leadership. GCoM is built upon the commitment of over 10,000 cities and local governments across 6 continents and 138 countries. In total, these cities represent more than 800 million people. By 2030, Global Covenant cities and local governments could account for 2.3 billion tons CO2-e of annual emissions reduction.

In Australia, 27 councils are members of GCoM. To join the GCoM, you need to develop citywide knowledge, goals, and plans that aim at least as high as your country’s own climate protection commitment(s) or Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to the Paris Climate Agreement.

As a partner of the GCoM, you need to undertake the following:

STATELOCAL GOVERNMENT
ACTAustralian Capital Territory (Canberra) 
NSWByron Shire
NSWNewcastle
NSWPenrith
NSWSydney
NSWTweed Shire 
NSWWollongong 
SAAdelaide
SAMount Barker
SAWest Torrens
TASHobart 
VICDarebin City Council
VICGlen Eira 
VICHobsons Bay City Council 
VICManningham 
VICMaribyrnong 
VICMelbourne 
VICMelton
VICMoreland 
VICMornington Peninsula Shire 
VICPort Phillip 
VICWyndham City Council
VICYarra 
WAJoondalup 
WAMandurah 
WAMelville 
WAPerth

We recently helped the City of Newcastle with their submission to GCoM, so please contact us if you need help with filling in the GCoM questionnaire.

Local Governments that are members of C40

C40 is a network of the world’s megacities committed to addressing climate change. C40 supports cities to collaborate effectively, share knowledge and drive meaningful, measurable and sustainable action on climate change. In Australia, Melbourne and Sydney are members.

If you need help with your own target or plan

100% Renewables are experts in helping local governments and communities develop carbon mitigation and climate adaptation targets, strategies and plans. If you need help with developing a target and plan that takes your unique situation into consideration, please contact  Barbara or Patrick.

Please let us know if there are any commitments that are missing, or if any commitment needs a correction. You can contact us for high-resolution copies of the graphics in this article.

Feel free to use an excerpt of this blog on your own site, newsletter, blog, etc. Just send us a copy or link and include the following text at the end of the excerpt: “This content is reprinted from 100% Renewables Pty Ltd’s blog.