Tag Archives: Sustainability strategy

NSW electric vehicle initiatives and newly released fleets incentive

NSW Government opens up EV incentives and boosts funding

NSW green-lights and increases total funding for electric vehicles

Following the NSW Government’s announcement in June this year that it would be delivering a package worth $490 million to support and incentivise the transition to electric vehicles, measures are now being rolled out, with the Electric Vehicles Bill giving the green light to the incentives outlined in the EV Strategy.

On the 10th of November, this package was actually increased, with a further $105 million made available to boost uptake of EVs by fleet operators in NSW. So the total amount of funding now committed by NSW is $595 million.

The total funding available positions NSW as the leading state in Australia supporting the EV transition, according to the RACQ, who nonetheless note that all states are performing well and are accelerating their policy action despite the slow pace of policy action at a Federal level.

Demand for EVs is increasing

NSW Government’s support simply reflects the reality that passenger fleets are moving to electric, with more than 20 countries committing to ambitious goals for new vehicles to be EV during the period 2030 to 2040. This includes Norway where over 70% of new car sales are electric, and the UK which has promised to bring forward its 2035 target for banning new petrol and diesel cars to 2030. All major car manufacturers are investing in developing EV models, consumer sentiment in Australia is increasingly positive towards EVs, and there is greater model availability year-on-year.

While EV sales are still small in Australia, nearly 9,000 BEVs and PHEVs were sold in the first half of 2021, nearly doubling the market share of EVs compared with 2020.

So the trend for EV purchases and demand is up, and NSW Government’s package of measures will help to accelerate this further.

What incentives are now being rolled out?

For the original major EV measures announced that are most relevant to businesses in NSW, here is the current status.

Charging infrastructure that is highlighted includes ultra-fast chargers on so-called EV Super-Highways, EV Commuter Corridors and EV off-street parking chargers. Commuters in Sydney will be no more than 5km from an ultra-fast charger, and there will be no more than 100 km between chargers on highways.

Commuter and tourist EV charging plans will also be rolled out under this funding.

What will the new $105 million funding support?

NSW government is investing a further $105 million to support fleets to procure EVs.

If you are a NSW business, not-for-profit, vehicle hire company or local council, you have an opportunity to access incentives to support the purchase of battery electric vehicles (BEVs) or hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs).

This will help you bridge the cost of transitioning your fleet’s passenger, light commercial or sports utility vehicles to BEVs through a reverse auction tender process. Additional funds are also available for smart base charging.

Who is eligible?

There are two funding streams with different eligibility requirements. Bids will be assessed against other bids in the same stream.

  • Individual fleets – you must operate a fleet of at least 10 vehicles in NSW to support your organisation’s purposes. Eligible organisations include – but are not limited to – business, local council and non-government organisations.
  • Aggregators – you can offer incentive funding to NSW customers as part of the vehicle leasing arrangements you provide. This includes fleet management organisations and private businesses that offer fleet leasing arrangements to NSW customers.

To find out more, please visit their website.

How can you get involved?

There is an information session on 30 November 2021.

This event will give an overview of the application process, the bidding platform and key dates. Please read the guidelines and FAQs in advance to get the most out of this session. The funding round will open following this event. You can register for the bidding platform here.

How can we help you?

If you are considering planning for your fleet transition to electric, please send an email to patrick@100percentrenewables.com.au or call Patrick at 0408 413 597.

 

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What the latest IPCC report means for your net-zero target [with video]

The IPCC’s recently-released report, Climate Change 2021: the Physical Science Basis has issued the strongest call yet for urgent and deep cuts to be made to global greenhouse gas emissions.

The Working Group I Report says the window in which to deliver the “deep emissions cuts” needed to prevent the worst impacts of climate change is closing rapidly.

A key message from the report is that rapid reductions in emissions are required this decade to prevent long-term ecological and climate breakdown, with every fraction of a degree making a huge difference in avoiding a climate disaster.

The IPCC’s report five emission scenarios

The report examines five illustrative scenarios, which are[1]:

  1. Doubling of carbon emissions by 2050
  2. Doubling of carbon emissions by 2100
  3. Carbon emissions stay at current levels to mid-century
  4. Net-zero after 2050, and net negative emissions later in the century
  5. Net-zero around 2050, and net negative emissions later in the century

 

Figure 1: The five emission scenarios used in the latest IPCC report

The bad news is that in all five scenarios, the best estimate is that we will pass 1.5C in the 2030s, even under the rapid mitigation scenarios.

The lowest scenario for carbon emissions was designed to create a pathway to limit warming to 1.5C. So, if your organisation is committed to reach net-zero by around mid-century, then this scenario is the only one realistically available, provided you act now to reduce your emissions significantly this decade.

 

Figure 2: IPCC’s five emission scenarios[2]
So how much carbon can we still emit under a 1.5C scenario? This is what the next section on the remaining carbon budget will answer.

Carbon budget – how much carbon can we still emit?

The main driver of long-term warming is the total cumulative emissions of greenhouse gases over time. Carbon budgets are based on the fact that the amount of global warming can be approximated to cumulative carbon emissions.

We have a 50/50 chance to limit warming to 1.5C if we stay within a global carbon budget of 500 billion tonnes. At pre-pandemic global emission rates, this gives us under 11 years before we exceed 1.5C.

 

Figure 3: Remaining carbon budget. Figure adapted from FAQs from latest IPCC report

If we want a better chance – two in three – of achieving around 1.5C of warming by mid-century, then we can emit just 400 billion tonnes globally, and we have even less time to act.

Scenarios versus risk management

The problem with using these scenarios is that organisations tend to overlook the uncertainty that is involved with these scenarios. To say that we can emit 500 billion tonnes of carbon and still stay at around 1.5C of warming is incorrect – it simply gives a 50/50 chance that this will be the outcome. And at 400 billion tonnes, we have a two thirds chance of getting to around 1.5C.

Those odds are OK but not great. If a new product or service had a one-in-two or a one-in-three chance of being unsuccessful, you might want to invest further resources in a solution to ensure a higher chance of success. It should be the same for your business’ climate response.

Where to from here?

If we make deep cuts to emissions now, and keep going to rapidly decarbonise by 2040 or earlier then we may have a chance of keeping temperature increase to a safe level. We only have a small carbon budget remaining to limit warming to 1.5C. Meeting this goal is still achievable if we act quickly and decisively.

Starting today, making deep emissions cuts, and persisting on this path for years is the only response from governments and business that can achieve this.

So what immediate three steps can you take in your business?

1) Set a net-zero target that recognises the climate emergency

2) Develop a comprehensive carbon footprint and plan to decarbonise rapidly

3) Don’t wait – implement your plan

 

[1] IPCC, 2021: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Masson-Delmotte, V., P. Zhai, A. Pirani, S. L. Connors, C. Péan, S. Berger, N. Caud, Y. Chen, L. Goldfarb, M. I. Gomis, M. Huang, K. Leitzell, E. Lonnoy, J.B.R. Matthews, T. K. Maycock, T. Waterfield, O. Yelekçi, R. Yu and B. Zhou (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press. In Press, Figure SPM.8: Selected indicators of global climate change under the five illustrative scenarios used in this report

[2] Graphs from IPCC, 2021: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Masson-Delmotte, V., P. Zhai, A. Pirani, S. L. Connors, C. Péan, S. Berger, N. Caud, Y. Chen, L. Goldfarb, M. I. Gomis, M. Huang, K. Leitzell, E. Lonnoy, J.B.R. Matthews, T. K. Maycock, T. Waterfield, Yelekçi, R. Yu and B. Zhou (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press. In Press, Figure SPM.8: Selected indicators of global climate change under the five illustrative scenarios used in this report

Where can you get help?

100% Renewables are experts in helping organisations develop their carbon footprint net-zero strategies. If you need help, please contact  Barbara or Patrick.

Feel free to use an excerpt of this blog on your own site, newsletter, blog, etc. Just send us a copy or link and include the following text at the end of the excerpt: “This content is reprinted from 100% Renewables Pty Ltd’s blog.